Transferring a cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) genetic engineering capability to the African environment: Progress and prospects

Title 
Transferring a cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) genetic engineering capability to the African environment: Progress and prospects  
Publication Type 
Journal Article 
Authors 
Masona MV, Taylor NJ, Robertson IA, Fauquet CM 
Year of Publication 
2001 
Publisher 
Springer 
Place Published 
New York 
Volume 
120 
Journal 
Euphytica 
Issue 
Pagination 
43 - 48 
ISSN 
00142336 
Keywords 
biotechnology, capacity building, Cassava, genetic transformation in cassava 
URL 
http://www.springerlink.com/content/k58207977p5vh448/ 
DOI 
10.1023/A:1017587117514 
Reprint Edition 
This revised version was published online in July 2006 with corrections to the Cover Date. 
Abstract 

The procedures required to produce genetically transformed cassava were developed and are now in place in three laboratories in the USA and Europe. Future implementation and sustainability of transgenic technologies for the agronomic improvement of cassava will depend, however, on transferring these capabilities to locations where cassava has an important socioeconomic niche. If successful, such countries can apply the technology towards their particular needs. Training scientists from the developing countries in the transgenic biotechnologies is of primary importance in this effort. There are, however, many other factors including the availability of laboratory supplies, equipment, suitably experienced support staff, sufficient funding levels and biosafety considerations, which must be addressed and put in place before a transgenic program can be fully implemented in a given country. A transgenic capability is being transferred from the International Laboratory for Tropical Agricultural Biotechnology (ILTAB),USA, to the University of Zimbabwe. Three southern African cassava varieties were induced to form embryogenic suspension cultures at ILTA Band have been transferred to Zimbabwe. These tissues are presently being used as the basis of genetic transformation programs in both laboratories. Problems encountered in the transfer process as well as possible solutions aimed at adapting the available protocols will be presented.

 
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